Matches To Go

2017-03-27 — 2 Comments

by Sheena Kohlmeyer

As a wilderness traveler and advocate of being prepared, I appreciate those small boxes of ‘strike anywhere’ matches. They’re inexpensive yet can be life-saving if one’s vehicle breaks down beyond cell reception. They’re in my camping gear, kayaking bin, emergency evac go-bag, bedside table, and in my kitchen ‘everything’ drawer. I also keep a box of these matches in my vehicle. In the vehicle is where it’s especially important to pay attention to the amount of matches remaining in the box. In my world, travel bins and tins with wooden matches have a qualifying feature: matches are secured.

Years ago a friend showed me the burn scar caused by a fiery eruption in his shirt pocket while driving on a pitted backcountry road. He’d tucked a box of a few remaining ‘strike anywhere’ matches into his shirt pocket as he headed down a bumpy road. He had no idea the friction from the constant jarring could shake those match-heads enough to ignite them against each other. He recovered thankfully, and his story can help others. I certainly ensure my matches ‘to go’ cannot jostle. No accidental fireballs on my person or in my vehicle! Hopefully not yours either. So let’s keep them snug.

Transfer matches out of your homestead supply into the travel matchboxes to help keep those boxes full. Using an elastic band around the box keeps it handy for securing matches together into a bundle as their numbers dwindle and bumpy roads are ahead. Then you can rest assured that no matter how rough that backcountry road, your bound matches will not rub against each other and ignite. That’s my little tip today to help us all stay safe.

Waking up to snow flurries and freezing temperatures puts a damper on any northerner’s mood. After all, it’s officially spring now, right? Mother Earth will just take her own sweet time, and up here in the chilly Zone 3, gardens are still sleeping beneath frozen ground.

Braving the cold wind this morning, I pulled on my parka and my wool hat and stepped out to look for any bulb tips after a few warm days melted back the snow cover. Nothing in the front but it did have deeper snow. But in the backyard it’s more sheltered against the wall of the garage and… JOY!

A dozen tulips poking above the surface of the cold soil. Only a half an inch/couple of centimeters, but their brave presence delights me nonetheless. Then another gust of wind whips more tiny ice pellets at my face, chilling my ungloved hands until I retreat back indoors to warm up.

Looking out at the bleak, grey skies I realize I must go see my local florist. I need more evidence of spring, and I need it now!

Store-bought tulips, to the rescue. I made the sales clerk laugh with my standard silliness. She asks, ‘How are you today?’ ‘Well,’ I said somberly but with a twinkle in my eye, ‘I’m having a flower emergency.’ She laughs, ‘A flower emergency?!’ ‘Yes! Here I am out at a store, haven’t done my makeup or hair (I gesture to my toque covered head) and I feel like I can’t get anything done on this miserable day until I get some flowers.’ Like I said, tulips to the rescue!

Since the ones growing in my yard are still weeks away from blooming, these tulip blooms are brightening my home today, and my mood. Now, after sharing with you my dear readers, off I go to get some more work done. Thank heavens for florists!

My front yard, today. . .

My front yard last summer!

If you like farmhouse style, you’ll understand my joy of this simple bathroom redo. This tiny pic (left) is the only ‘before’ I have. Note the sharply angular faucet and glass counter. This modern, chrome, black, glass, angular esthetic was absolutely nothing like me and it evoked the strangest feeling. . . like I was in someone else’s house.

Loved the sink though. The only thing I wanted to keep. But how I hated the floor tiles on the tub surround, extending 16″ beyond the tub and halfway past the toilet, blocking the addition of shelves or art above. The counter was clear glass on a black and chrome vanity with space below showing pipes and offering zero storage. Cold. Black. Metallic. Glass. Did I mention cold?

Here’s the new white vanity I bought at Lowes for $150, waiting for the install. With a jigsaw I cut out the back to accommodate the plumbing. Behind, note the previous mirror/shelf on its side. SO not me. Happy to donate to the Habitat For Humanity ReStore!

From IKEA I picked up a cash-and-carry butcher block counter, 25″x 7′ for less than $200. Now to learn more about how to use my circular saw. I learned to tighten the bolt that holds the blade in place. I learned that butcher block is very dense, and one must not ‘push’ the saw while cutting. A couple of my first cuts left burn marks on the edges! I learned that the correct way is to let the saw ‘do the work’. We’re here to hold and guide, but not push. From that great IKEA butcher block purchase I got a counter, 3 thick shelves, and a long rack for towel hooks. Plus a nice remnant cutting board!

Much needed storage shelves can finally go up! The studs above the toilet have an 18″ spacing so for the best shelf install, I lined up the left brackets into the studs, and the right brackets into drywall anchors. This step is when I learned that butcher block is not only challenging to cut, but is also very difficult to drill through. I needed to pre-drill every hole with a larger bit than usual, using the exact same size as the screws. Let me repeat: butcher block is very dense and solid! It’s not really easy to work with, but in my opinion, it’s worth every extra step needed. I love it!

Keeping costs down, I did a lot of the work myself. The biggest cost ($1500) was the labor for the removal and re-tiling of the tub surround with the tiles I’d purchased on sale at Lowes. Shower fixtures on sale at Home Depot (plumber was $800 for shower & vanity sink install). The mirror was purchased first, months before the reno even began. It was at Home Depot marked down to $60 and I loved it. I knew I could some day have the farmhouse-style bathroom I really wanted. Now I do!

As soon as this small yet wonderfully effective renovation was completed, I finally felt like I was at home. At last. This is indeed my very own home. Where I can relax, soak in a bath, and just be myself.

Here are points I like to consider when heading out to camp. First of all, it helps to live close enough to decent campgrounds to visit regularly. Getting to know the drive and the area you’ll be camping in builds your confidence with each trip.

campsite-moon-lhickey

Art by Lisa D. Hickey

RESERVE or GO OUT EARLY

It is not worth anyone’s time to pack the cooler, tents and everything needed into the vehicle, then drive an hour or two or whatever it takes, only to arrive at a sold out campground. It’s worth reserving a spot ahead of time. Some campgrounds are only first come first served so I arrange time off for driving out mid-week. If I had to work, I’d drive out Wednesday evening, set up a tent on the campsite I wanted, and pay for the days until I can return. It has to be Wednesday. Thursday is pushing it. I’d never head out on a Friday. There’s enough campers around that for the past couple of years whenever and wherever I go camping, the place is sold out by Friday morning, if not Thursday.

SITE HAS PLENTY OF TREES

Trees are everything camping is about for me and I’m so lucky to live not far from heavily forested areas. I love the look of trees, the sound the wind makes in their branches, the shade they offer, the designs in their trunks. I especially enjoy how they help me create shelter with tarps. Camping is about creating shelter. That’s what we’re doing after all, right? We’re building a ‘home away from home’. And even though the metal fire ring and gravel area are ‘fixed’ there are often several tree trunks to select from for securing tarps for shelter and privacy.

camp-hammock

I love this old hammock!

HAS A GOOD PAIR OF TREES

My ideal campsite will have a well-placed pair of strong trees for my hammock. And by ‘well placed’ I mean, among other things, upwind of the fire. A hammock secured between two trees for a midday rest, reading, watching the sky, listening to birds, feeling the breeze, just dozing… it’s like heaven in a campground. The most refreshing short sleeps of my life have taken place in my camp hammock.

KNOW THE SIZE OF YOUR SET-UP

Campsites are all different shapes, sizes, and orientation to the wind and the sun. It really helps in choosing the best site to know sizes of everything that you’ll be adding. For me it’s a 17’ SUV, 8×8’ tent, 5×3’ privacy tent, 12×12’ shade shelter, various tarps, the chopping area, woodpile, a couple of folding chairs and the hammock. You can use a cheat sheet with measurements and a tape measure but soon you won’t need that. Every camper who sets up his or her own tents and tarps learns to assess a site. One has to be able to stand in an empty space and visualize the ‘set up’. If it doesn’t feel right, move on and keep looking. Being able to pick and choose from empty campsites until I find the right one is why I head out mid-week.

PLACEMENT OF THE ESSENTIALS

BEAR-BINS: How far away are the daily-use bear bins? After the last meal of the day, wrap everything up into a tight garbage bag and take it over. This is part of my daily bike rides, my evening campground trip over to the “bear-bins”, or bear-proof heavy duty metal garbage bins. When it’s getting dark it can feel a bit scary but I have bear spray in my holster, and I know how to use it! Also, I listen carefully and keep alert.

PLAYGROUND: People generally choose nearby if they have kids, or farther for more quiet. Obviously. However, even though my kids are grown and I prefer hearing birds and breezes over boisterous children, I’ll choose to camp near the playground over the bear bins, which are usually at the opposite end of the campground. Some of my camping trips located near playgrounds had hardly any noise, and I’ve been far from the playground and had an RV full of school aged kids park beside me. It’s all good.

A small Mule deer buck

A small Mule deer buck greets me just outside the bathroom.

BATHROOMS: The bathroom building (often without plumbing these well-built concrete structures have very strong hinged doors) is a tricky item to consider at your campground. You don’t want to be too far away, but at the same time the closer you are, the more annoying the sounds (I’ve never had an issue with odor). Sure there’s the increase in traffic, but worse is the slamming door. The heavy doors are spring-loaded and most people just dash out, letting them slam. I don’t like that sound myself when I’ve had to camp close to the bathroom building, so I’m one who catches the door as it closes. It only takes a second and I walk away from the building quietly, without the door slamming.

WATER: Again, weigh the pros and cons of having to travel farther but having less foot traffic, or the opposite. Water weighs so much that I try to incorporate my bike if possible, or will use my vehicle as a last resort, but mostly I bring enough water from home to last several days. Note, for extra precaution the pump water from campgrounds should be boiled before using.

PHONE: Yes, some of the campgrounds I enjoy are so deep into the mountains that there is no cell service. At these places I trek to the old-school payphone at least once a day to let someone know “Hi! All’s well.” Plus how much longer I’m staying. As a solo camper I prefer sites with service for the safety it helps provide. But at times, when my desire to go camping is stronger than the sites available, I’ll drive farther out and camp anyways. It requires more trust, and confidence. Yet it’s always good to know the site manager has a Satellite phone for emergencies.

campsite-manager

Learn where the manager’s site is.

MANAGER: Personally, I prefer to be close to the manager’s site. First of all firewood is (almost) always available for purchase from their site, in addition to the trucks that come around a couple of times a day. I’ve also found that off-leash dogs and late-night partying tends to not occur in campsites close to where they are. I prefer to be within emergency whistle or air horn hearing distance to them. Usually an older couple living in their gorgeous RV for the summer season, plus the day staff who drive the firewood trucks, are who manage campgrounds. I like to learn their names early in the season. These hard working folks deserve a greeting from appreciative campers like me.

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Every time I go camping it’s in the perfect site! But some locations have been better than others. These tips help me in my quest for the most comfy, cozy site. I hope they can help you too! Keep clean campsites, never feed the animals, and let’s all be safe. Enjoy!

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[Copyright © 2017 Gina~Inga, Front Yard to Backcountry]