Budget Farmhouse Bathroom

If you like farmhouse style, you’ll understand my joy of this simple bathroom redo. This tiny pic (left) is the only ‘before’ I have. Note the sharply angular faucet and glass counter. This modern, chrome, black, glass, angular esthetic was absolutely nothing like me and it evoked the strangest feeling. . . like I was in someone else’s house.

Loved the sink though. The only thing I wanted to keep. But how I hated the floor tiles on the tub surround, extending 16″ beyond the tub and halfway past the toilet, blocking the addition of shelves or art above. The counter was clear glass on a black and chrome vanity with space below showing pipes and offering zero storage. Cold. Black. Metallic. Glass. Did I mention cold?

Here’s the new white vanity I bought at Lowes for $150, waiting for the install. With a jigsaw I cut out the back to accommodate the plumbing. Behind, note the previous mirror/shelf on its side. SO not me. Happy to donate to the Habitat For Humanity ReStore!

From IKEA I picked up a cash-and-carry butcher block counter, 25″x 7′ for less than $200. Now to learn more about how to use my circular saw. I learned to tighten the bolt that holds the blade in place. I learned that butcher block is very dense, and one must not ‘push’ the saw while cutting. A couple of my first cuts left burn marks on the edges! I learned that the correct way is to let the saw ‘do the work’. We’re here to hold and guide, but not push. From that great IKEA butcher block purchase I got a counter, 3 thick shelves, and a long rack for towel hooks. Plus a nice remnant cutting board!

Much needed storage shelves can finally go up! The studs above the toilet have an 18″ spacing so for the best shelf install, I lined up the left brackets into the studs, and the right brackets into drywall anchors. This step is when I learned that butcher block is not only challenging to cut, but is also very difficult to drill through. I needed to pre-drill every hole with a larger bit than usual, using the exact same size as the screws. Let me repeat: butcher block is very dense and solid! It’s not really easy to work with, but in my opinion, it’s worth every extra step needed. I love it!

Keeping costs down, I did a lot of the work myself. The biggest cost ($1500) was the labor for the removal and re-tiling of the tub surround with the tiles I’d purchased on sale at Lowes. Shower fixtures on sale at Home Depot (plumber was $800 for shower & vanity sink install). The mirror was purchased first, months before the reno even began. It was at Home Depot marked down to $60 and I loved it. I knew I could some day have the farmhouse-style bathroom I really wanted. Now I do!

As soon as this small yet wonderfully effective renovation was completed, I finally felt like I was at home. At last. This is indeed my very own home. Where I can relax, soak in a bath, and just be myself.